The Simplest Raised Garden Bed you can Build Yourself

I am not handy with tools, so remember, if I can do this, you can too. All you need is a drill, some drill bits, and 3” outdoor screws.

Go to your closest lumber store and purchase 2 boards and ask them to cut them for you. I got mine at Lowe’s and they did not charge extra for cutting them. I bought the cheapest wood I could find and because this is for vegetable gardening, I did not want treated lumber. 2×12 by 12 foot long. If you have them cut 4 feet off each board, you will now have 2 – 8 ft boards and 2 – 4 ft boards which is perfect for an 8×4’ garden bed! If you go online, you could probably find the price for lumber in your area, I think it cost me about $35 for 1 bed. I was so worried that the boards would eventually bow and warp that I also purchased 8 – 24” rebars (about $2 each)that I pounded into the dirt about 1 foot below ground level on the outside of the garden raised beds_LIboxes (which left 1 foot showing). They were placed at each corner and two in the middle of each long side, so 8 total rebars for one bed. The reason I left 1 ft showing was for the cold months when I would want to cover the raised bed. As you can see I just eyeballed the spacing and depth. Also, I’ve had these first 2 beds for going on three years now and they haven’t warped at all.

20190217_081126A PVC pipe fits perfect over the 1 ft rebar and I just bend it over to the other side. Super easy to set up and tear down. I used another PVC for the ridge pole and wound some twine around the intersections to hold it in place. Then I got some heavy-ish plastic sheeting to cover it. I gathered and stapled the ends to a 4 ft 2×2 to add some weight so the winds wouldn’t blow it off. And it held up great to 20190421_085833some fairly rough winds and a few inches of snow even! It may not be the prettiest but it got the job done without extensive carpentry skills.

This year, I decided to add two more 8×4’ raised beds, then went on to add a third 8’x4’ and a 4’x4’. The most expensive part is filling it. The least expensive way to fill it is to take a pickup and a tarp and go to the local nursery that sells garden soil by the yard. They will dump ½ yard of it in my pickup bed (on the tarp which I then wrap over the top to keep it from blowing away before I get back home). This is a bit more labor intensive for me instead of buying bags at the big box stores but it is cheaper in the long run. I don’t fill the beds to the brim because every year, I add compost and mulches that get worked in.

Materials I used for a basic raised bed:

  • 3” outdoor screws, 4 on each corner, 16 total
  • Small drill bit to pre-drill each hole
  • Ryobi Battery-powered drill

Happy gardening!

“Agriculture… is our wisest pursuit, because it will in the end contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness.”  -Thomas Jefferson

Advertisements

It’s SPRING!

20190322_164153 It was 60 degrees on Tuesday and almost 65 today! Time to move these babies outside.

This tray is full of lettuces, Kale, Bok Choi, Swiss Chard, Broccoli, Mustard, Spinach, and onions. I have a couple of  herbs in there too but they can’t go outside yet.

I let them harden off during the day for the past week while I built the raised beds they would be going in. Now that the night time temps are above freezing they stay out all night. And I have more lettuce still growing under the grow lights inside. They are too small yet. I have four kinds of lettuce this year: Parris Cos Island, Tom Thumb, Summertime, and Butterhead. I believe they are all cut and come again varieties.

I built 2 more raised bed frames last weekend and got them leveled. 20190318_163210Then I went to a local  nursery and got a pickup load of soil blend to fill them with. First, I layered some homemade compost on the floor of the beds and then shoveled the soil blend overtop. As you can see from the picture below, there is room for more but I will plant the closest one with my seedlings so I won’t add anymore to that one until next year.

20190322_164002

 

 

In the picture on the left in the forefront, is the pea trellis. I planted peas there yesterday after soaking them overnight. Tomorrow I will put in the same bed, French Breakfast radish seeds and Rainbow carrot seeds. I might throw in some garlic chives or onion too. The back two older beds container my worm towers which I took out and rinsed for the new season. Last spring I ordered some worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm (https://unclejimswormfarm.com/) to help aerate the soil and add needed nutrients. I need to make two more for my new beds, and 1 for the cinderblock bed. I add kitchen scraps and moistened paper to the towers that have holes drilled in their sides for the worms to come and go.

How fun and satisfying to be outside playing in the dirt again. What projects are you working on in your garden this season?